Tag Archives: college admission

3 Reasons Reading is the Key to Getting into College

Everybody knows that reading is really important once you’re in college. Most college classes typically involve lectures followed by massive reading assignments. If you don’t like to read, college is going to be a struggle.

Most people know this, but did you know that reading is actually the key to getting into college in the first place?

Here are three reasons reading is the key to getting into college:

1. Admission Tests

Your high school grades are important to colleges, but admission test scores are equally important.

Why?file0001494750257

SAT and ACT scores are important because they are consistent.  Grades can vary from school to school. An A+ at one school may not equal an A+ at another school. Some teachers require more out of their students. For example, getting a B+ in a challenging chemistry class may mean that you have learned and can apply more knowledge than a student who received an A+ in a chemistry class with a teacher who wasn’t challenging at all.

The bottom line is that if you want to get into college you will need to demonstrate your knowledge and ability through a good score on the SAT or ACT.

So what does any of this have to do with reading?

Reading drastically improves SAT and ACT scores. It’s all about vocabulary and comprehension. To do well on either the SAT or ACT you have to have excellent reading comprehension and vocabulary.  Being able to read (and understand what you are reading) will help you in every section of the admission tests. You will save a lot of precious time if you don’t have to stop and think about what words mean and what the questions are asking.

Reading is the single best way to improve vocabulary and comprehension. You can prepare for the admission tests by studying vocabulary specifically, but honestly, how long can you study the dictionary? Reading is a much more natural and effective way to improve your vocabulary. The earlier you start the better. Reading should be a part of your daily routine.

 2. Essays

When it comes time to start applying for college, students will need to be able to write. Essays are a crucial part of the college admission process as well as the scholarship process. Colleges want to find out about who you are and what better way is there than through your essays.

But wait, I thought this article was about reading not writing? It is, I promise.

Consistent and regular reading is one of the best ways for you to develop your own voice, your storytelling voice. Reading great books, magazines, blogs or anything else that interests you will help you learn how compelling stories are told. As you read you will naturally and effortlessly absorb great writing skills. You’ll learn more about writing from reading your favorite sci-fi series than you could possibly imagine and it won’t even feel like studying.

3. The Reading List

Are you smart? Prove it. Colleges want to know if you are smart enough to handle their most challenging courses. After all, colleges are all about academics. A lot of students will only submit the required information to colleges when applying, but you can do more.

Submit a copy of your reading list.

Show admission officers that you are self-motivated and that reading is a part of who you are. They know that reading is crucial to your success at college and this will go a long way in helping them see that you are ready.

So what are you waiting for? Set some goals for yourself this summer to read more than ever before. You’ll be glad you did.

What About You?

Now I’d like to hear from you. What’s your reading list look like? Do you even like to read?

Share your favorite book(s) of all time below. Maybe we can all find some great books to add to our reading list. Thanks so much.

 

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The PSAT: A Cautionary Tale

Why You Need to Take the PSAT Seriously

Here I go. I’m about to dive into one of those “when I was your age” speeches.Test

As a side note I just turned 30 last month so I’m now officially old by most teenagers’ standards. Being old comes with its perks though, one of which is that I can now give both the “back in my day” and the “when I was your age” speeches. So at least I’ve got that going for me…

But like I was saying, back when I was a freshman in high school I remember my guidance counselor coming into my homeroom class to talk to us one day.  Now when the guidance counselor came to homeroom it almost always meant one of two things.  It either meant that we were going to be having a captivating discussion on self-esteem, self-respect, or bullying; or it meant that we were getting out of our scheduled class for some kind of state standardized/mandated test.

This time it was the latter.

This time she came to tell our class about a practice test we all had to take, the PSAT. The practice SAT, also known as the “we get to go sit in the school library and take a test that doesn’t mean anything, but gets us out of P.E. class” test.

She mentioned something about the test being a great opportunity for us to practice our test-taking strategies so that someday if we take the real SAT for college admission we’ll be more prepared.

First of all, test-taking strategies; I didn’t even know what that meant. As a freshman the only test taking strategy I had ever heard of was guessing “C” on multiple choice tests when you don’t know what the answer is.

Next, she promised us that if we’d just take it this one time we’d be done with it and we wouldn’t have to worry about taking another test like it until our junior or senior year when we would take the real SAT.

Needless to say, I didn’t give the PSAT much thought. I was usually pretty good at tests so I wasn’t worried.  I figured that when the time came to take the SAT I’d be just fine. And anyways, it was my freshman year; how was I supposed to remember what I learned during a practice test when I wouldn’t even take the real test till my junior or senior year?

I was prodded along with the other students into the library; I sat in my seat and I got to it. I figured that if I hurried up and finished this useless test early then I would have lots of time to doodle on the scrap paper that I brought with me.

I don’t remember a single thing about the test. I don’t remember if it was easy or hard. I don’t remember what types of questions were on it. It’s as if the Men in Black came and Will Smith personally memory swiped my brain immediately after I finished filling in the last bubble.

Maybe Will Smith did a memory swipe on me, maybe not. In all reality, I’m guessing that the real reason I don’t remember much about it is because I didn’t care. It didn’t mean anything to me. I didn’t see any reason to put any effort into the test.

By the way, the one thing I do remember is getting done early and drawing a pretty sweet picture of the school librarian as an evil cyborg.  It was awesome.

Take Responsibility

It wasn’t until long after high school that I finally realized how dumb I was. Basically, it all came down to taking personal responsibility. I didn’t take responsibility for my own education. If someone didn’t give me a compelling argument for why I should do something I didn’t do it. In high school I needed to be persuaded to make an effort and if I couldn’t see the immediate and direct benefit of something I simply didn’t participate in that thing; whatever it was.

The PSAT was no exception.

My guidance counselor didn’t adequately show me the benefits of taking the PSAT seriously, so I didn’t. She didn’t tell me that I could get a full ride scholarship based on the results of this “practice” test. She didn’t tell me I could take the test up to three times to try and get that full ride scholarship. She didn’t tell me that high scores on this test would open doors to almost any university. She didn’t tell me the results of this test could change my future in ways I couldn’t even imagine.

When I first found about the importance of that test years later I was a little irked. Well, more than a little. I was ticked. I immediately tried to blame her for my lack of knowledge (and my massive student loans).

But it’s not her fault.

She may have done a lousy job sharing the importance of test, but in all fairness I didn’t ask any questions about it either. I didn’t research it myself. I could have gone online and learned about the PSAT and the National Merit Scholarship. I could have done a lot of things, but I didn’t. As a freshman in high school I thought I didn’t need to worry about college or life after high school. I still believed that it was everyone else’s responsibility to lead me into a bright and successful future.

Shame on me.

The PSAT is NOT a Practice Test

If I had done a little research I would have learned that the PSAT was not a practice test. The “P” didn’t even stand for practice. It stood for preliminary. I would have learned that the test was logic based not content based and that if you spend a little bit of time learning how the questions are formatted you can improve your score dramatically.

In my next post I’m going to share with you the nuts and bolts of the PSAT. We are going to talk about why this test can be nearly as important as the SAT. I’m going to share with you all those things I wish I would have been told about this test when I was a freshman in high school. It’s exciting stuff and I’m eager to get into it. I really hope that you’ll benefit from what we’ll be going over during the next few posts. Wisdom is the ability to learn from the mistakes of others. Learn from my mistakes I’m laying them out there freely as a caution for you.

Until next time.

 

 

 

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ACT: Two Dates Left

Juniors and seniors have options when it comes to college admission tests. Some students take the SAT, some the ACT, some take both.  The ACT is a test that measures what a student has learned. It has 5 components: English, math, reading, science, and an optional writing test.

Your ACT score is one of the major criteria that admissions officers will be looking at when they make the decision whether or not to accept you. If you take the test early you’ll have plenty of time to retake it if you need to. Don’t push the ACT off to the last minute.

April 12th  is the next available test date for the ACT.  The registration deadline for that test is March 7th.

June 14th is the last test date available for seniors. The registration deadline for that test is May 9th. 

For more information about the ACT and to register online for an upcoming test visit: http://www.actstudent.org/regist/

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SAT: Two Dates Left

If you’re a junior or a senior planning on going to college then you probably already know the importance of a good SAT score.  Your SAT score is one of the main criteria that admissions officers will be looking at. Your SAT score lets them know what you know and how well you can apply that knowledge.

It’s a good idea to take the SAT during your junior year of high school.  Taking it your junior year leaves you with enough time to retake it your senior year if you find that you need to raise your scores.  If you’re already a senior and haven’t taken the test yet, you still have 2 more test dates available to you.

March 8th is the next test date. The registration deadline for that date is Feb 7th.

May 3rd is the last test date available to seniors this year. The registration deadline for that date is April 4th.

For more information about the SAT and to register online for an upcoming test visit: http://sat.collegeboard.org/login?applicationId=115&destinationpage=https://nsat.collegeboard.org/satweb/login.jsp&view=NSAT

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Dan Miller on 100% College Admission

Please check out this link: Here’s a Sad Goal – 100% College Admission

I stumbled across this post by Dan Miller, Author of 48 Days to the Work You Love. I couldn’t agree more with what he says. College is not for everyone. But so many people are pressured into going at the risk of looking like a second class citizen. In the “real world” people are valued based on what they can bring to a company or what they can produce not what degree they have.

By the way, If you don’t know who Dan Miller is I highly recommend subscribing to his weekly podcasts. If you aren’t listening to podcasts you should be.  I’ll be writing about their countless advantages in an upcoming post.

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